Ni

 

Tríona Ní Dhomnaill (Ireland): Tríona (Gael-Linn CEF 043, 1975)
Folk/Rock
Tríona Ní Dhomnaill (lead vocals, harpsichord, bodhrán)
The Skara Brae and Bothy Band member’s solo set is a superb folk/rock LP: richly melodic and hauntingly beautiful, given distinction (and a pronounced classical edge) by her superb harpsichord work. Along with Loudest Whisper, Mellow Candle and Mac Murrough, this stands as a cornerstone of seventies Irish folk music. GRADE: B.
See also Bothy Band, Nightnoise, Relativity, Skara Brae, Touchstone, Various ‘From Lagan To Lee’

Nia Ben Aur (UK): Nia Ben Aur (Sain 1019M, with insert, 1975)
Folk/Rock/Progressive
Heather Jones (joint lead vocals), Caryl Parry-Jones (backing vocals), Sioned Mair (backing vocals), Gaenor (backing vocals), Gwennan (backing vocals), Meinir Evans (backing vocals)
Featuring some brilliant tracks, this little known progressive folk concept album brings together the talents of some of Wales’s finest underground musicians and bands of the seventies (Heather Jones, Sidan, Hergest, Edward H Dafis and others). In terms of its vibe, I’d compare it to Loudest Whisper’s Children Of Lir, but the music sometimes has a different feel, with a more uptempo rock mood and some powerful lead guitar. GRADE: B.
See also Injaroc, Heather Jones, Caryl Parry-Jones, Sidan

Penny Nichols (USA): Penny’s Arcade (Buddah BDS 1007, with booklet, 1967)
Singer/Songwriter
Penny Nichols (lead vocals, guitar)
Like many singer/songwriters of the era, Nichols bears a definite resemblance to Joni Mitchell; but, unlike many, she’s far from a blatant copy. Backed by a crack team of musicians including Peanut Butter Conspiracy leaders Al Brackett and John Merrill, she creates some sweet and charming moods with a slight psychedelic edge (notably on the standouts ‘Moon Song’ and ‘Look Around Rock’). There’s nothing particularly profound here, but anyone liking the genre will be won over by her bittersweet atmospheres. GRADE: C+.

Nick-Nack (USA): Albion (Rot RR33-24, 1982)
Rock/Progressive
Susan Bartels (lead vocals)
This obscure album blends hard rock and progressive elements on ten short but sometimes rhythmically complex tracks. The band display a definite Yes influence here and there (especially on ‘Hymn For Her’) but they also have a foot in the mainstream rock camp, with some barroom touches. The results aren’t brilliant, but they’re often catchy and sometimes mildly interesting. GRADE: C+.

Nico (West Germany): Chelsea Girl (Verve V / V6 5032, 1967)
Folk
Nico (lead vocals)
Nico’s solo debut differs from all her other albums for the simple reason that she doesn’t write the songs: half are by her Velvet Underground cohorts John Cale and Lou Reed, and three of the remainder are by her former lover Jackson Browne. It’s an eerie and atmospheric record, with most songs setting her doleful croon against gentle electric guitar, baroque strings and flute; she was apparently so upset by the orchestrations that she burst into tears on hearing the mixed tapes. Nonetheless, they add colour to what could otherwise have been a slightly one-dimensional gothic folk album. The eight-minute ‘It Was A Pleasure Then’, co-written by Nico, Cale and Reed, is completely different, being a feedback-drenched piece of experimental rock in the vein of the Velvets. Altogether this is a fine and beautiful LP, if not as daring as its more acclaimed follow-up. GRADE: B–.
Nico (West Germany): The Marble Index (Elektra 74029, 1968)
Avant-Garde
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
Nico’s second solo album is as mournful and baroque as her first, but far more avant-garde. This time round, she writes all the songs and contributes the rudimentary harmonium, whilst John Cale provides all the other backing. The result is a truly ghostly, sepulchral collection of songs, dominated by her woozy and repetitious playing and ponderous foghorn voice, interspersed with all kinds of clanking effects; it’s perversely varied too, from the classical viola accompaniment of ‘No One Is There’ to the electronically treated vocals of ‘Facing The Wind’. However, the most remarkable cut is the closing ‘Evening Of Light’, which transforms from a hauntingly beautiful ballad into a disorientating cacophony. The Marble Index is an experimental rock classic, although many listeners will hear little more than a formless, one-dimensional mess. GRADE: B.
Nico (West Germany): Desertshore (Reprise RS 6424, 1970)
Avant-Garde
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
This is similar in style to The Marble Index, although mostly less avant-garde and startling. That’s not a bad thing, as Desertshore achieves a haunting, glacial beauty rarely found on its significantly weirder counterpart. In particular, the opening ‘Janitor Of Lunacy’ is among Nico’s finest compositions, the largely acapella ‘My Only Child’ has a stunning vocal arrangement (confirming that she really could sing, something not always obvious) and ‘Afraid’ is an exquisitely atmospheric ballad. Throughout, the album owes a heavy debt to chamber music, and in its own way it’s as original as The Marble Index. GRADE: B.
Lou Reed, John Cale & Nico (USA/UK/Germany): Le Bataclan ’72 (Alchemy Entertainment PILOT193, UK, CD, 2003, recorded 1972)
Folk
Nico (joint lead vocals, harmonium)
The first half of this historically important document features Reed and Cale as a duo, performing Velvet Underground classics unplugged (fascinating, but not a patch on the originals) and fairly uninteresting solo numbers. But when Nico takes centre stage, the album is transformed, containing some of her most beautiful and haunting performances. GRADE: C+.
Nico (West Germany): The End (Island ILPS 9311, 1974)
Avant-Garde
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
The law of diminishing returns was setting in for Nico by this time: whilst this maintains the basic style of The Marble Index and Desertshore, it’s nowhere near as original as the former or as starkly beautiful as the latter. Phil Manzanera adds some discordant guitar work and Brian Eno shards of screeching synthesiser, but these weirdnesses sound forced and fail to disguise that this time round Nico’s singing and writing is nowhere near as good. Finally, her cover of the Doors’ ‘The End’ is little short of embarrassing, sounding like a sarcastic self-parody. Whilst this is by no means a bad album, the time was clearly right for Nico to take an extended break from recording. GRADE: C+.
Nico (West Germany): Drama Of Exile (Aura AUL 715, UK, 1981)
Rock/New Wave
Nico (lead vocals)
Nico’s only rock-based work outside the Velvet Underground is a masterpiece. Whilst the music is heavily influenced by new wave in general and David Bowie in particular (climaxing with a superb cover of his ‘Heroes’) there are also strong experimental, progressive and North African edges due to the presence of guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Mahammad Hadi (of the Algerian band Rahmann). Add in some of Nico’s best songwriting, and the result is a genuinely remarkable LP. Due to contractual disputes with the label, which have never been fully explained, the material was re-recorded (with a slightly different track listing) and issued again in 1983. GRADE: B.
Nico (West Germany): Do Or Die! (Reachout International A117, cassette, USA, 1982)
Rock/New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
This obscure but interesting live album features material recorded across Europe, and is split between older numbers (performed with simple harmonium accompaniment) and newer material and Velvet Underground classics (performed with band backing). The latter songs sound rather tinny and low-budget compared to the originals, reflecting Nico’s reduced circumstances, but this is an enjoyable set throughout. GRADE: B–.
Nico (West Germany): En Personne En Europe (½ CASS2, cassette, UK, 2003)
Rock/New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, keyboards)
This live set is a mixed bag, with poor versions of ‘Heroes’ and ‘I’m Waiting For The Man’ but a few decent moments elsewhere. The most unusual song is probably the closing ‘Orly Flight’, on which Nico accompanies herself on piano rather than her trademark harmonium. As an odd footnote, the guitar player is Lyn Oakey, formerly of 9.30 Fly. GRADE: C+.
Nico & The Faction (UK/West Germany): Camera Obscura (Beggars Banquet BEGA 63, UK, 1985)
New Wave
Nico (principal vocals, harmonium)
Nico’s final studio album is radically different from Drama Of Exile, with sparse electronic backing blending influences from electropop, new wave, industrial music and even a touch of free jazz. The end result is unmistakably Nico and as eerie and gothic as ever, but if anything has dated worse than her earlier LPs. Two cuts break the mould: a straight but rather sinister cover of ‘My Funny Valentine’ and the self-penned ‘König’, accompanied only by her own harmonium, which sounds like an outtake from The Marble Index or Desertshore. GRADE: C+.
Nico (West Germany): Behind The Iron Curtain (Castle Communications DOJO LP 27, double album, UK, 1986)
New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
The back cover claims that this was recorded in Warsaw, Budapest and Prague, but keyboardist James Young later claimed that it was taped on a cheap cassette on the mixing desk at a show in Holland. Whatever the truth, it’s a solid representation of Nico live with the Faction – not my favourite era of her career, but there’s some good stuff here. The double LP also received a simultaneous release as a single CD, with the whole of side three removed. GRADE: C+.
Nico (West Germany): Live In Tokyo (Dojo DOJOCD 50, CD, UK, 1987)
New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
This is possibly Nico’s best album with the Faction, capturing a generally excellent performance. I never liked her version of ‘The End’, but that aside there are few weak moments here. GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): An Underground Experience + Heroine (Visionary Communications VISDVD001, DVD, UK, 2000, recorded 1983?)
Rock
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
As with the All Tomorrow’s Parties DVD below, this features two entirely separate sets – 'An Underground Experience' shows her performing with a rock band, whilst 'Heroine' is essentially unplugged, centring around Nico and her harmonium and concentrating on older material with a more neoclassical feel. When they were filmed is anyone’s guess – she looks haggard in the electric set and serene (not to mention in much better voice) for the acoustic performance, which suggests that the latter was earlier. (That said, she cleaned up towards the end of her life, so the reverse could be true.) Either way, 'Heroine' is excellent, 'An Underground Experience' is ragged but very enjoyable, and this is a much-needed release. GRADE: B–.
Nico (Germany): All Tomorrow’s Parties (Cherry Red CRDVD123, DVD, recorded 1983 & 1984?)
Rock
Nico (lead vocals, keyboards)
This DVD features again two separate live shows – one from the Library Theatre in Manchester in 1983 and the other shot at an unknown venue on an unknown date, though I’d guess at 1984 – as well as a version of ‘Orly Flight’ from the Haçienda’s Birthday Party plus some backstage footage. The video and audio quality is basically that of a bootleg, and this isn’t my favourite Nico era, showing her moving towards the minimalist industrial style of Camera Obscura, but it’s certainly a fascinating historical document. GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): All Tomorrow’s Parties (Cherry Red CMDGOTH25, double CD, 2007, recorded 1983 & 1984?)
Rock
Nico (lead vocals, keyboards)
The audio version of the set features the same mediocre sound quality and the same rather variable performances – but once again, I’m very glad it was released. GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): Chelsea Live (Great Expectations PIP CD 039, 1992, recorded 1985)
New Wave
Nico (lead vocals. harmonium)
This London gig from 1985 mixes solo performances with her harmonium with numbers backed by the Faction. I’ve never been entirely keen on their thin, electronic sound, and ‘One More Chance’ in particular is downright awful, but mostly this was a pretty atmospheric show. The disc was later compiled along with the Drama Of Exile album, both sides of the ‘Sãeta’/‘Vegas’ single and six alternate versions of Drama cuts to form Femme Fatale – The Aura Anthology (Castle Music CMDDD732, double CD, UK, 2003). GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): Heroine (Anagram CDMGRAM 85, CD, UK, 1994, recorded 1985?)
New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
According to the back cover, this was ‘recorded live at the Library Theatre Manchester circa 1980’ but judging from the tracklisting and arrangements I’d say that was nonsense – this sounds like a mid-eighties performance with the Faction. Despite some annoying amplifier buzz, this is generally well recorded and a pretty solid set. The highpoint by far is an extremely beautiful version of ‘Afraid’ from Desertshore, sounding as exquisite as the studio original. GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): Nico V Brne (OS Fléda, with inner and plastic slipcase, 2012, recorded 1985)
New Wave
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
This lavishly packaged limited edition (500 copies) captures Nico’s illegal concert in Brne in October 1985 in good but not great sound quality. Whether the world really needed yet another concert document of Nico with the Faction is moot, but this is probably as good as any other. GRADE: C+.
Nico (Germany): Nico’s Last Concert – Fata Morgana (SPV CD 084-96202, CD, 1994, recorded 1988)
Progressive
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
Although Nico was born and raised in Germany, this is her only album that could reasonably be described as Krautrock. Taped at the Berlin Planetarium at an event organised by her former partner Lutz Ulbrich, this mostly comprises a suite of new music that would presumably have formed her next studio album had she not died around six weeks later. It’s remarkable stuff: complex yet minimalist, gothic and eerie, using the Faction to their best effect for the first and only time. Having left her heroin addiction behind, it’s clear that Nico was poised for a major artistic renaissance, making her early death all the more regrettable. As a footnote, edited segments of the show had previously been issued as Hanging Gardens, misleadingly billed as her final studio recordings. GRADE: B.

Nico (West Germany): Reims Cathedral December 13, 1974 (Cleopatra CLP 9430, CD, 2012, recorded 1974)
Avant-Garde
Nico (lead vocals, harmonium)
This fascinating archive release captures Nico performing entirely solo in the suitably Gothic surroundings of Reims Cathedral. The echoing acoustics are perfect for her eerie and mournful material, and whilst John Cale’s intricate arrangements are somewhat missed, this is far more satisfying and consistent than one would expect from an album simply featuring voice and harmonium. The set had previously circulated as a bootleg, and some recording problems remain on the opening ‘Janitor Of Lunacy’. GRADE: B–.
See also Velvet Underground

Nicòla (France): Nicòla (Ventadorn VS 3L 29, 1976)
Folk/Rock/Psychedelic
Nicòla Alziary (lead vocals)
This interesting Occitan album (also known as Leissem Lei Escapar after the inscription on the back cover) alternates dark folk, sometimes almost acapella, with electric rock with a psychedelic edge. The radical mix of styles is surprising, but highly effective. GRADE: B–.
Nicòla Mé Leis Enfants (France): Parulas D’Ier Par Enfants De Deman (Ventadorn VS 3L 84, with booklet, 1981)
Folk
Nicòla Alziary (principal vocals), Malvina Giraudo (occasional vocals), Estela Mé (occasional vocals), Marion Scollo (occasional vocals)
No prizes for guessing from the artist credit and title that Nicòla’s completely different second album was for, and recorded with, young children. The numbers sung by Nicòla, to traditional Occitan folk instrumentation, aren’t bad, but the children’s sung and spoken contributions are predictably excruciating. Overall, this is an odd and deeply disappointing LP in light of its predecessor. GRADE: D+.

Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Niebiesko-Czarni (Pronit XL 0331, 1966)
Beat
Ada Rusowicz (occasional vocals), Helena Majdaniec (occasional vocals)
This Polish beat album isn’t about to change anybody’s life, but it certainly has its moments – most notably the lively harmonica-led instrumental ‘Komandosi’ and the delicate guitar piece ‘Maria Elena’. Elsewhere this is pleasant if not especially distinctive mid-sixties pop, with its Polish origins never making themselves obvious. As a footnote, the band was all-male and used guest vocalists on various cuts, with Ada Rusowicz and Helena Majdaniec fronting two songs apiece. GRADE: C+.
Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Alarm! (Pronit XL 0410, 1967)
Beat
Ada Rusowicz (occasional vocals), Helena Majdaniec (occasional vocals)
This is slightly different from their first – bluesier in parts and mildly psychedelic in others, with some stinging fuzz guitar but also larger arrangements featuring keyboards and occasionally horns. Whether it’s better or worse is moot – I rather liked the stripped-down nature of their first, but then again I like the ornate organ here, not to mention the fuzz. GRADE: C+.
Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Mama Dla Was Kwiaty (Pronit XL 0481, 1968)
Beat
Ada Rusowicz (joint lead vocals)
The luscious psychedelic cover is absolutely stunning, but despite some occasional fuzz guitar the music is still firmly in mid-sixties beat mode. In fact, with quite a lot of strings, it’s a bit more MOR than before, though it’s still pleasant, engaging and parochial stuff. GRADE: C+.

Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Twarze (Pronit XL / SXL 0560, 1969)
Beat
Ada Rusowicz (joint lead vocals)
This is dated for 1969, but since when did one expect cutting-edge music from behind the Iron Curtain? For what it is, it’s nice enough: their brand of bluesy, horn-laden pop is decidedly appealing, but out in the wider world Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead et al were making the boundaries move. GRADE: C+.
Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Rock-Opera Naga 1 (Pronit XL / SXL 0881, 1972)
Pop/Rock/Jazz
Ada Rusowicz (joint lead vocals)
This slightly later rock opera project is somewhat different, though don’t expect anything bordering progressive. Instead, this is jazzy pop with some slyly funky rhythms and occasional excellent fuzz guitar, though the MOR tinges from their earlier work remain. As such, it once again sounds a good two-to-three years behind the time, though that’s par for the course for albums from Communist countries. GRADE: C+.
Niebiesko-Czarni (Poland): Rock-Opera Naga 2 (Pronit XL / SXL 0882, 1972)
Pop/Rock/Jazz
Ada Rusowicz (joint lead vocals)
Unsurprisingly, part two of the ‘Rock-Opera’ is in a similar vein, though it’s perhaps a bit more accomplished than the first instalment. This ambitious project was the band’s last gasp in the studio, though live reunions and retrospectives have appeared over the years. GRADE: C+

Niekku (Finland): Niekku (Olarin Musikkii OMLP 11, with inner, 1987)
Folk
Leena Joutsenlahti (joint lead vocals, bass, violin, flute, recorder, pipe, jouhikko), Liisa Matveinen (joint lead vocals, drum, violin, kantele), Maria Kalaniemi (joint lead vocals, violin, harmonica), Anna-Kaisa Liedes (joint lead vocals, violin, kantele, jouhikko), Anu Itäpelto (joint lead vocals, violin, kantele)
This mostly female band’s debut mixes delicate instrumentals using local and early instruments with a few acapella numbers. Both types of material have a strongly Finnish feel, adding distinction to an accomplished yet slightly academic album. GRADE: C+.

Niekku (Finland): Niekku 2 (Kansanmusiikki-Instituutti KILP 18, with insert, 1989)
Folk
Leena Joutsenlahti (joint lead vocals, flute, clarinet, recorder, jouhikko), Liisa Matveinen (joint lead vocals, flute, clarinet, kantele), Maria Kalaniemi (joint lead vocals, violin, harmonica), Anna-Kaisa Liedes (joint lead vocals, violin, kantele, jouhikko), Anu Itäpelto (joint lead vocals, violin, kantele)
The acapella numbers are gone and vocals are kept to a minimum here, with the entire first side being instrumental. Coupled with a more haunting and spacy feel to the music, these are positive developments – this could have some appeal for progressive music listeners and might even represent a more organic and acoustic sidestep from artists like Enya. GRADE: C+.
Niekku (Finland): Niekku 3 (Olarin Musikkii OMLP 27, with insert, 1989)
Folk 
Leena Joutsenlahti, Liisa Matveinen, Maria Kalaniemi, Anna-Kaisa Liedes, Anu Itäpelto
With just six long tracks, their final LP again has a bit more of a progressive edge. Whether it’s their best is moot – all their albums are lovely, atmospheric and delicate, with a slightly eerie mood. GRADE: C+.

Candice Night (USA): Reflections (Minstrel Hall Music MHM 0527, CD, Germany, 2011)
Pop
Entirely self-penned, Night’s solo album mixes lush folky ballads recalling Blackmore’s Night and uptempo pop/rock recalling Shania Twain or any number of mainstream American artists. She’s a more than competent songwriter and the songs are beautifully performed (presumably by Blackmore’s Night, though there are no musician credits) but it all sounds rather generic and not particularly heartfelt. GRADE: C.
See also Blackmore’s Night

NightWatch (UK): NightWatch (Poke PROD 002, 12", 1988)
Folk/Rock
Alison Heywood (keyboards, accordion, saxophone), Ruth Whiddon (percussion, drum programmes)
With synthesisers and (unfortunately) programmed drums, this electric folk album is modernistic in every way, and for the most part pretty lively too. Three of the four fairly short numbers are instrumental and all are pretty good, with some nice progressive edges. Whilst my grade may be a little generous for such a short and slight release, there is some excellent music here and they have the distinction of not sounding like anyone else. GRADE: B–.

Nikel’s Spuk (West Germany): Nikel’s Spuk (Schneeball 27, with poster, 1981)
Rock
Karla Kassimir (backing vocals)
This political rock album is a mixed bag, opening with the dull reggae-flavoured pop number ‘Was Mag Das Sein’ but quickly improving with the lengthy, rather psychedelic ‘Was Ist Das Für Ein Stein?’. The remainder is fairly mainstream, polished rock hinting at late seventies (Pyragony X or Only Human-era) Amon Düül II and is pleasant and well-assembled without being particularly memorable. GRADE: C+.

Nikki & The Barons (UK): Remember (LWF LWF-2, 1973)
Folk/Pop/Rock
Not a lounge pop album as the band name might suggest, this is instead a mixture of acoustic folk and garagey electric folk/rock, with a really peculiar tracklisting, including ‘Over The Rainbow’, ‘Sloop John B’, ‘I Don’t Know How To Love Him’, a Beatles medley, and, believe it or not, several Christmas carols. As a result, the LP is rather patchy, although the overall standard is surprisingly high. Judging from the homemade look of the piece, I would imagine a maximum of 99 copies were pressed. GRADE: C.

Nil (France): Quarante Jours Sur Le Sinaï (Nil, CD, with booklet, 2002)
Progressive
Roselyne Berthet (principal vocals)
Consisting of a continuous suite lasting more than an hour, this is an ambitious album indeed. Much of the music is excellent, but the changes of mood and tempo are not handled at all well, making this sound like a collection of random musical happenings rather than a cohesive set. Coupled with an unusually bright production, this makes for a rather tiring listen. GRADE: C+.
Nil (France): Nil Novo Sub Sole (Unicorn UNCR-5021, CD, Canada, 2005)
Progressive
Roselyne Berthet (lead vocals)
Like its predecessor, this contains some powerful, dynamic and exciting prog. However, also like its predecessor, it’s frequently disjointed and not particularly cohesive, so once again this is a promising rather than fully satisfying set. GRADE: C+.
See also Thork

Ninth Amendment (USA): Soft Sunshine Soul (Two:Dot HRH32069, 1969?)
Pop
Despite the title, there’s no soul on here: this five-piece band (three men and two women) mixes Mamas & Papas-style harmony folk with sunshine pop. The sound is glossy and professional throughout, and the songwriting and performances are as good as anything in the genre, making one wonder why this only appeared on an obscure private label. Like everything on Two:Dot, this is extremely scarce.

GRADE: C+.

Nirvana (UK): Secrets (Master Room, acetate, 1972?)
Rock
Marsha Hunt
In the early seventies, Nirvana decided to adapt some of their songs into a musical, for which they also wrote several new pieces. The working title for the project was Secrets, though they later changed this to Bloood[sic]. In any case, the project was abandoned, but not before it was recorded with an all-star cast of musicians: Patrick Campbell-Lyons confirmed that Marsha Hunt definitely sang on it and believes that Eric Clapton and Steve Winwood play guitars and keyboards respectively, though his memory is a touch hazy. When the band decided against proceeding, a single copy was cut as an acetate for one of the key personnel. But what of the music? This is excellent melodic rock, with highly professional singing and playing (as one might expect) and even some Mellotron on one number. Some of the songs have a fifties feel, which is typical for this sort of project, but even those are enjoyable, completing a fascinating curio and top-flight rarity.

GRADE: C+.

Nitro-Function (USA): Nitro-Function (Pye NSPL 28158, UK, 1971)
Rock/Psychedelic
Charlotte Vinnedge (joint lead vocals, guitar)
Nitro-Function was essentially a continuation of Jimi Hendrix’s Band Of Gypsys, with Charlotte Vinnedge replacing Hendrix on lead vocals and guitar. Their sole album was very much in the Hendrix vein, unsurprisingly, with lots of heavy wah-wah guitar, but the great songs and hooks that made Hendrix a superstar are mostly absent. GRADE: C+.
See also Luv’d Ones

Nitzinger (USA): Nitzinger (Capitol SMAS 11091, with inner, 1972)
Rock/Metal
Linda Waring (drums, percussion, backing vocals)
Aside from the slightly spooky acoustic ballad ‘No Sun’ (ironically the album’s highpoint), this is good-natured hard rock from a power trio with a female drummer. It’s enjoyable enough, with some excellent guitar leads, but all as boneheaded as song titles like ‘LA Texas Boy’, ‘Louisiana Cock Fight’ and ‘Boogie Queen’ suggest, so don’t expect Led Zeppelin or Deep Purple. GRADE: C.
Nitzinger (USA): One Foot In History (Capitol SMAS 11122, with inner, 1973)
Rock/Metal
Linda Waring (drums, percussion)
For their second and final album, the band added a second guitarist and broadened their musical palette with greater use of keyboards and occasional orchestration. Much more varied than its predecessor, One Foot In History displays considerably more mature songwriting, with only a couple of tracks being as straightforward and unambitious as the material on their first. GRADE: C+.